Food reading: Stupidity in Concentration

I’ve begun reading Wendell Berry, as part of some research that I’m doing, and finding, as Michael Pollan says of him, that his writing makes so clear things that should already be self-evident, and it does so in a way that is “always patient and logical, as plumb and square and scrupulous, as well-planed woodwork”. I could share about a million quotes that demonstrate this, but this one is my favourite so far. He’s writing about the stupidity of factory-farming animals, but the ideas here could apply to all sorts of areas:

“If the people in our state and national governments undertook to evaluate economic enterprises by the standards of long-term economics, they would have to employ their minds in actual thinking. For many of them, this would be a shattering experience, something altogether new, but it would also cause them to learn things and do things that would improve the lives of their constituents.” (from Stupidity in Concentration, 2002)

What I love about Berry’s writing is that he doesn’t forget farmers in his talk of the stupidity of the overall system. While its not universally the case, so much of the criticism of our food system neglects to mention farmers — which, unconsciously I’m sure, serves to lump them in as part of the problem. In fact that problem is the overall business model — which, for the most part is something that’s as much imposed on farmers as it is on the people who eventually eat the food it produces.

“It ought to be obvious that in order to have sustainable agriculture, you have got to make sustainable the lives and livelihoods of the people who do the work. The land cannot thrive if the people who are its users and caretakers do not thrive.” (from Stupidity in Concentration, 2002)

Definitely something worth remembering.

~

This essay is from a collection of Berry’s work, entitled Bringing it to the Table: On Farming and Food, which is available on Amazon here. (Full disclosure: I’ve got an affiliate account with them, which means I’ll make a small commission if you purchase the book through that link.)

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4 thoughts on “Food reading: Stupidity in Concentration

  1. Very interesting, Soph.

    The more I think about how flawed our food system is (and how flawed the mainstream Western way of life is), the more I want to go ‘off the grid’ so to speak, and start living a more responsible lifestyle, by producing food/resources for myself, finding and use innovative solutions and clever ways of living so that my impact is minimal, and also to take care of my waste in a responsible way.

    You may be interested in this piece by Julian Cribb, which talks about similar concepts but in a broader context: http://www.news.uwa.edu.au/201206274769/opinion/re-naming-human-race?page=show

    • Same! But then I wonder just how realistic that is. And, if it is realistic, how responsible — in a broader social context — it is. I haven’t made up my mind yet…

      Thanks for the link!

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